Fats, Oils and Grease

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Help PBUD fight FOG!

 FOG mugshot trio

Fats, oils and grease that make their way into the wastewater system can cause problems in the sewer system pipes.   Grease in a warm liquid may not appear harmful but as the liquid cools the grease or fat congeal onto the surface of the interior of pipes and other surfaces.  Buildup will decrease pipe capacity and lead to stoppages and backups and sometimes even cause a shutdown of wastewater treatment units.   Each year millions of gallons of wastewater is discharged nationally through Sanitary System Overflows (SSO).  Wastewater overflow goes into the local environment and surrounding bodies of water directly impacting local wildlife.  In addition to the environmental cost, there is a financial one as well.  Issues caused by FOG mean more frequent cleaning and sometimes require piping to be replaced earlier than otherwise expected.   Sewer backups can be costly to taxpayers as well as the Utility. It is important to properly dispose of fats, oils and grease as well as other household waste.  Customers can take a few simple steps to help prevent sewer backups and protect our infrastructure and the environment.

How you can help:

  • NEVER pour fats, oils or grease down drains or toilets.
  • Always pour or scrape cooled fats, oils, and grease into a covered, disposable container and throw it away.
  • Soak up remaining oils and grease with an absorbent material such as a paper towel and throw it into your garbage.
  • Before washing dishes, scrape food scraps, fats, oils and grease into your garbage or compost.
  • Follow us on Facebook to see more tips and updates  
  • Commercial establishments can visit the FOG Policy and Procedures page to learn more and to print required forms and applications.

PIPE WITH FOG BUILDUP VS CLEAN SEWER PIPE

FOG pipe small    clean sewer line

Sewer pipe before and after cleaning.